Introduction:

Parents have the right to be present when a physical examination is performed on their child (minors)
Medical treatment of a minor requires parental consent


During a general physical examinations of a minor, the patient's legal guardian or a medical staff member must be present in addition to the person performing the examination. *Parents are the natural guardians of their children until age 18.

Unaccompanied Minors at the Community Primary Care Clinic

  • Minors under the age of 14
    • Medical examinations or procedures should not be performed without a parent (or adult chaperone acting on a parent's behalf) present in the clinic.
    • In any event, except for in emergency situations (according to the definition in The Patient's Rights Law), no private or invasive examination may be performed on a minor under the age of 14 while not in the presence of a parent (or adult chaperone acting on a parent's behalf).
    • In an emergency situation, if a chaperone is not present, an examination may be performed in the presence of another medical staff member, preferably of the same gender as the minor.
  • Minors over the age of 14 -
    • Treating medical professionals are permitted to perform an examination or routine medical procedure even without the express consent of a parent (or adult chaperone acting on a parent's behalf) for a child over 14.
    • Treatment of the minor without the consent or presence of a parent (or someone appointed on the parent's behalf) is permitted as long as the minor gave informed consent for the examination or procedure.

Who is Eligible?

  • Any parent has the right to be present when an examination is performed on their child.
  • All patients being examined are entitled to request the presence of a family member or anyone else of their choosing during a physical examination.

Please Note

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