Introduction:

One may not fire pregnant employee who has worked for the same employer or at the same place of employment for more than 6 months without special permission from the Employment of Women Law ombudsman
One may not fire a pregnant employee because she is pregnant even if she has worked for the same employer for less than 6 months (the Employment of Women law ombudsman will never grant a permit if the reason for the dismissal is because of the pregnancy)
If a pregnant employee is fired without a permit, a complaint may be filed against the employer with the labor law enforcement department
A woman who is unlawfully fired while pregnant may sue the employer for monetary compensation
For further information see Section 9a of the Employment of Women Law


Firing a pregnant employee (including someone who has worked less than 6 months) because of her pregnancy is considered to be a form of prohibited discrimination according to the Equal Employment Rights Law and it is therefore prohibited to fire an employee because of her pregnancy effective from the first day of her employment.

  • If the women has worked for the same employer or in the same workplace for at least 6 months, she cannot be fired for any reason without without a permit from the Employment of Women Law Ombudsman in the Ministry of Social Affairs, Social Service and Labor (the permit will never be given if the reason for the dismissal us because of her pregnancy).
    • In the even that an employer wants to fire an employee while she is pregnant the employer must submit a permit request to the Ministry of Social Affairs, Social Service and Labor's Regulation Division.
    • The Employment of Women Law Ombudsman will only give the special permit if the ombudsman has been convinced that the employee's firing is not related to her being pregnant. It is up to the ombudsman's discretion not to give the permit even if the firing was not not related to the employee being pregnant after considering all of the circumstances of the case related to labor relations.
    • The employer is required in every case, to request this permit when firing someone who is pregnant and has worked in the same place of employment for more than 6 months, (even if it seems clear that the firing of an employee had nothing to do with her being pregnant).
    • The dismissal of a pregnant employee without a permit as described above is intrinsically void and the employee will be entitled to all of her rights as if she had never been fired.
  • In the event that an employee was unlawfully fired during her pregnancy, she is entitled to sue the employer and demand monetary compensation.

Who is Eligible?

  • Any pregnant employee (at all stages of pregnancy).

How to Claim It?

  • If a woman is unlawfully fired while pregnant, the firing is considered to have never occurred, and the employee is entitled to take any of the following actions:
    • File a complaint against the employer with the labor law enforcement division.
    • Sue the employer in the labor courts for monetary compensation equivalent to the salary and benefits to which she would have been entitled had employee-employer relations continued as they were before the dismissal.
  • A pregnant woman who worked for less than 6 months for the same employer or in the same place of work, and was fired because of her pregnancy, is entitled to sue for compensation based on the Equal Opportunity in the Workplace Law. The employee has the burden of proof to show that there was no reason for her dismissal and the employer has the burden of proof to show that he/she did not fire the employee because of her pregnancy.
  • A pregnant woman who has worked for 6 months or more for the same employer or in the same place of work, and was unlawfully fired is entitled to to sue for compensation based on the Women's Employment Law. If she was fired because of her pregnancy she is also entitled to sue for compensation based on the Equal Opportunity in the Workplace law.

Please Note

  • Dismissal of a pregnant employee without a permit constitutes a criminal offense. See the "Court Rulings" section below.
  • When an employee reaches the fifth month of her pregnancy she is obligated to inform her employer of the pregnancy
  • The employer is also prohibited from firing an employee during her Maternity Leave, her Unpaid Leave Following Maternity Leave if she took it and for 60 days after she returns to work. For more information on the restrictions to fire or change the work terms of a woman during or after her maternity leave see:

Court Rulings

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