Introduction:

Employees are entitled to use sick days to care for a family member
According to the law, employees are entitled to receive sick pay starting from the second day of absence from work
Parents of someone with disabilities are entitled to sick pay from the first day of absence from work


Employees are entitled to accrue days of absence on account of their accrued Sick Days due to taking care of a close family member.

  • The following table details different cases of eligibility and contains links to pages with more comprehensive information on each type of eligibility:
Reason for absence from work Maximum number of sick days Additional details
Ill spouse

Malignant illness of a spouse

Up to 6 days per year

Up to 60 days per year

Sick Days Due to an Ill Spouse
Spouse's pregnancy or childbirth Up to 7 days per year Sick Days Due to a Spouse's Pregnancy or Childbirth
Illness of a child under age 16 Up to 8 days per year

Up to 16 days per year for single parents

Sick Days Due to an Ill Child

Sick Days Due to an Ill Child for a Single Parent

Illness of a child under age 18 who has a malignant illness or who requires dialysis treatment Up to 90 days per year

Up to 110 days per year if he/she is the only parent caring for the child

Sick Days Due to an Ill Child

Sick Days Due to an Ill Child for a Single Parent

Caring for a child with special needs (of all ages) Up to 18 days per year

Up to 36 days per year if he/she is the only parent caring for the child

Sick Days for a Parent to Care for Offspring with Disabilities
Ill parent Up to 6 days per year Sick Days Due to an Ill Parent
Caring for a spouse that donated an organ Up to 7 sick or vacation days per year Sick or Vacation Days for Absence to Care for a Spouse that Donated an Organ
Caring for a parent that donated an organ Up to 7 sick or vacation days per year Sick or Vacation Days for Absence to Care for a Parent that Donated an Organ

Receiving Sick Pay

  • According to the Sick Pay Act, the first day of the period of absence (and in any one day absence), the employee will not receive any payment or salary.
  • On the second and third day during this period of absence, the employee is entitled to receive half of his/her daily wage, and from the fourth day onward the employee is to be paid a regular wage, as if he/she has not been absent from work.
  • If a parent of a child with disabilities is absent from work in order to care for that child, he/she is eligible for full sick pay starting from the first day of absence.
  • An employee who has not received entitled payment for sick leave may claim compensation from the employer.
  • For more information, see Sick Pay.
Tip
If the employee is a government employee or if the employee has a collective agreement or a personal employment contract that establishes better payment terms than the law (such as a higher payment for sick days or payment from the first day of absence), they will act according to the collective agreement, agreement or contract and not by the law.


Who is Eligible?

  • Anyone who works.


Court Rulings

Please note

  • If the employee used up his permitted sick days and is in need of additional absences from work to care for a family member, he is allowed to: ask his employer to use the remainder of his sick days, take the days at the expense of his accrued vacation days, or request to take unpaid leave. All of these are conditional upon the employers consent.
  • Additionally if the employee quits in order to care for an ill spouse, he/she is entitled to severance pay. For more information see Severance Pay for Employees who quit due to the deteriorating health of a spouse.
Tip
If the family member who needs care is a child of the employee, and it is a serious medical condition, money can be taken out of the Savings Plan for Every Child fund, even if the child is not yet 18 years old, as long as the funds taken out are for the medical needs of the child. For more information see Removal of funds from the "Savings Plan for Every Child" fund before age 18 due to the medical condition of the child.

Aid Organizations

  • Click here for detailed information about employment assistance organizations.

Government Agencies

Laws and Regulations

Credits